The University of Utah
College of Architecture + Planning

Where Urban Sprawl Makes It Tougher for the Poor to Rise Up the Social and Economic Ranks | CityLab

Where Urban Sprawl Makes It Tougher for the Poor to Rise Up the Social and Economic Ranks | CityLab

A research team led by University of Utah planning scholar Reid Ewing reevaluated the sprawl-upward mobility link using a more sophisticated sprawl index that takes into account factors like density, mixed uses, activity centers, and street-network accessibility. Their findings, published in a recent issue of the Landscape and Urban Planning, strongly support the idea that a spread-out metro area is a harmful one for social progress. (Some initial findings from Ewing and company emerged in a 2014 technical report, but the new paper elevates the work into a peer-reviewed publication.) The researchers conclude that “upward mobility is significantly higher in compact than sprawling metropolitan areas/commuting zones.”

Source: Where Urban Sprawl Makes It Tougher for the Poor to Rise Up the Social and Economic Ranks – CityLab
Photo: A Google Earth image of Atlanta, GA