The University of Utah
College of Architecture + Planning

Prof Ewing and Ph.D. student Sabouri to give webinar entitled “New Travel Demand Modeling for our Evolving Mobility Landscape” on February 11

Prof Ewing and Ph.D. student Sabouri to give webinar entitled “New Travel Demand Modeling for our Evolving Mobility Landscape” on February 11

Conventional four-step travel demand models are used by nearly all metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs), state departments of transportation, and local planning agencies, as the basis for long-range transportation planning in the United States. A flaw of the four-step model is its relative insensitivity to the so-called D variables. The D variables are characteristics of the built environment that are known to affect travel behavior. The Ds are development density, land use diversity, street network design, destination accessibility, and distance to transit. In this seminar, we will explain how we developed a vehicle ownership model (car shedding model), an intrazonal travel model (internal capture model), and mode choice model that consider all of the D variables based on household travel surveys and built environmental data for 32, 31, and 29 regions, respectively, validates the models, and demonstrates that the models have far better predictive accuracy than Wasatch Front Regional Council (WFRC)/Mountailand Association of Governments’ (MAG) current models.

In this webinar, researchers Reid Ewing and Sadegh Sabouri will demonstrate the effectiveness of the new travel demand model and how to implement it by integrating it into the traditional four-step process.

Photo by Jacqueline Kelly